Revolutionizing Cancer Research Through Technology: Eric Lefkofsky’s Tempus

Eric Lefkofsky’s background in healthcare technology is well suited for helping doctors and other medical professionals find cures for cancer. Lefkofsky co-founded Tempus Labs in 2015 for the express purpose of making cancer research more readily available to researchers. He has a deeply personal reason for creating the necessary computer systems to help doctors and other researchers access information quickly. His own family has been affected by cancer and he has seen the results of good research with his own family. Lefkofsky’s family foundation offers monetary support for the American Brain Tumor Association, MD Anderson, and John Hopkins Medicine.

Lefkosky’s collaborations with the National Cancer Institute’s comprehensive cancer centers yielded many good results. Vital information about how to treat incurable cancers is a huge contribution to medical science. The work that Tempus Labs does helps researchers with gene therapy and gene editing biotechnologies designed to help treat untreatable diseases. The combination of technology and medical science has revealed a solution to a rare form of inherited vision loss.

Tempus Labs provides medical scientists with the data they need to treat cancer effectively. Tempus Labs ecosystem collects, analyzes and cleanses data so medical professionals can apply the findings to their work. Tempus’ main work is with molecular sequencing. Physicians use the data collected and analyzed to provide therapeutic treatment for their patients.

Lefkosky’s contribution and his organization’s technology expertise recently provided Stanford University the tools they needed to create an algorithm that diagnoses skin cancers. Patients with atrial fibrillation benefited from the research done by scientists who utilized Tempus Labs’ operating system.

Tempus Lab is also involved in many other projects that are bound to benefit human beings. Empowering physicians to battle cancer is the primary mission of this organization. The Lefkosky Family Foundation’s mission is to enhance the quality of human life. Lefkosky’s passion for healthcare technology is well-known. What is not as well-known is that Eric Lefkofsky also invests in other technologies such as disruptive technology and e-commerce.

The future is bright for innovative technology that enhances people’s lives. Lefkosky’s determination to utilize the tools that modern technology provides is admirable.

Learn More: www.lightbank.com/team/eric-lefkofsky

Seattle Genetic’s Clay Siegall Shares NFL News And Opinion

On his blog Chief Executive Officer Clay Siegall posted an ESPN article about one of Tom Brady’s family version Super Bowl rings. The ring was owned by one of his family members who put it up for auction. It sold for a record amount for Super Bowl rings, $344.927. The last ring to sell for a record amount was in 2012 when the Lawrence Taylor, formerly an LB for the Giants, sold his for $230,401. The family version of a Super Bowl ring is similar to the one Tom Brady still owns but it has 18 fewer diamonds in it and is 10% smaller.

In other NFL news on his blog, Clay Siegall has another ESPN article about the Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back Peyton Barber. He has dyslexia but he says that he considers his condition as an asset, not a disability. He says that when he tries to read his playbook it often makes little to no sense. To understands the playbook by reading it over and over again as well as drawing them out on paper. What helps the most, though, is that he does a physical walkthrough of each play so that he can fully understand it.

Clay Siegall is the CEO of Seattle Genetics, Inc. He co-founded this company in 1998 and became the CEO in 2001. When their first drug was approved by the FDA, Adcetris, he said that he and his team had basically no experience at all when it came to launching a drug commercially. Because of this he formed a partnership with another firm, Takeda, to successfully launch this cancer drug in the United States and Canada. He says that in return for Takeda paying his company substantial amounts of money they brought his drug to market and handled the marketing.

Over the past 17 years Clay Siegall has formed partnerships with a number of pharmaceutical companies. He says that sometimes he is approached to form a partnership and sometimes he seeks them out. One of the partnerships Clay Siegall signed was with Astellas and he signed a 50/50 partnership with them for their cancer drug Enfortumab vedotin.